Course Outline

Week One –August 24-28

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Week Two — August 31-Sept 4

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Week Three — September 7-11

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Week Four  — September 14-18

Monday

  • Platforms for Data Viz:  the problem with intention
    • Discussion of Tanya Clement

Wednesday

  • Lab: learning Jigsaw
  • The origins of the algorithm–what happens when the data viz designer comes from a quantitative background and not qualitative?  (security, business, science, statistics, geo-physical)

Friday

  • Jigsaw lab
  • Skype session with lead developer. Dr. John Stasko, Georgia Tech

Week Five — September 21-25

Monday

Wednesday

FridayScreenshot 2014-07-01 01.21.36

 

Week Six  September 28-Oct. 2

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Screenshot 2015-08-05 20.39.08

Week Seven  October 5-9

Monday

  • Discussion of Lima, Chapter 4
  • Guest Skype session with Scott Weingart, Carnegie Mellon U, Network Visualization
  • Exploration of datasets

Wednesday

Friday

  • Exploration  and creation of datasets
  • Discussion of Segel and Heer
  • Reading for Wednesday, Lima Chapter 5 “The Syntax of a New Language”

Week Eight  (FALL BREAK)

October 14-16

Wednesday

  • Databases for the Humanities–cont.
  • Discussion of Lima, Chapter 5

Friday

Week Nine October 19-23

Monday

Wednesday

  • Creating datasets in and for Gephi
  • Guest speaker, Prof. Jordi Comas, School of Management

Friday

  • Lab Gephi
  •  Read Elijah Meeks’ blog;

Screenshot 2014-09-15 15.32.43Week Ten  October 26-30

Monday

Wednesday

Gephi

Friday

Week Eleven  November 2-6

Monday — Final Gephi session

Wednesday

Friday 11/6
(Micki Kaufman talk — lunchtime ACWS 108)
Design Studio
In design studios  you will hone your skills in designing visualizations by sketching and producing paper-based prototypes.  You will work on analyzing a dataset and creating multiple sketches of visualizations to address the dataset either alone or in teams, depending on the task.  Some design studios will require peer critique.

For the final project:

Examples of acceptable datasets:
literary works in a historical period or culture
historical events
networks of authors, artists, thinkers, characters
citation networks
email networks
mapping “influences” of works of art or artists/writers/styles
mapping texts (linguistic analysis)
mapping courses/majors/curricula

Week Twelve November 9-13

Monday 11/9–Design Studio

Wednesday 11/11-Design Studio

Friday 11/13
Snap talks on final projects

Week Thirteen  November 16-20

Monday 11/16–Working on Final project

Wednesday 11/18–Working on Final Project

Friday 11/22–Working on Final Project

Week 14/15 November 30-Dec. 7
Here is what to expect for the final four days of class:

Monday November 30

Course evaluations

Final consultations about project presentations

This presentation should act as a milestone for the final project.  You don’t have to hand in a final blog post at this point and you don’t have to have your website completely ready.  But you should have at least 15 slides to present.
For your project presentation you should have completed your data acquisition. You must also have your data structure ready.
You must have a working visualization prototype. You need not have all your views up and running, and it need not be completely interactive, but the direction and the content must be clear.
Your team will present the progress made since the snap talk.  You will have 20 minutes to discuss the project, show the class how you have pursued the research question, demonstrate the interactive visualizations you already have.  There will be peer review of your project presentations.  There will also be peer assessment of your team members.


Wednesday December 2

project  presentations

1.Bobby and Adem–Presidential Debates

2.Jerry and Albert  Epic Story

Friday, December 4

3. Nadeem and Erin

4. Diane

Monday December 7

5. Yifu, Jiaming, and Jinbo, Poker face

6. Katie Faull on the Lebenslauf project: Memoirs and DH

Wrap up!